Who What Wear – Mind Media Awards 2014

Fashion, News

Last night saw the Mind Media Awards take place at BFI Southbank in London. The awards ceremony celebrates the best examples of reporting and portrayal of mental health in print, broadcast and digital media and recognises media professionals, organisations, students and individuals who report responsibly and sensitively on mental health.

This year, Channel 4 won three out of the four television awards, My Mad Fat Diary won the Drama Award, Embarrassing Bodies: Live From The Clinic took the Entertainment Award and News and Current Affairs Award was won by Channel 4 News for their Life In Chains: Somalia’s Mentally Ill report.

The event, which was hosted by writer and journalist Helen Lederer, saw BBC’s Michael Buchanan and Community Care’s Andy McNicholl share the award for Journalist of the Year, for their investigations which exposed the crisis in mental health care, including shortage of beds, cuts to community services and children being placed on adult wards.

The event saw a diverse group of celebrities step out to show their support. Take a look at who was there and who wore what.

 

Denise Welch

Denise Welch, who attended with her husband Lincoln Townley, wore a bold monochrome mini-dress dress with black blazer and ankle boots.

 

JAMEELA

Jameela Jamil dazzled in a white strapless dress with structured skirt and an awfully cute pair of heels.

 

ceska

Made in Chelsea’s Cheska Hull was glowing in a floral strapless number.

 

DR DAWN HARPER

Embarrassing Bodies’s Dr Dawn Harper looked the picture of elegance a black off-the-shoulder satin dress and eye-catching necklace.

megan cox

Katherine Welby-Roberts and Megan Cox arrived together sporting glossy curls and delicate lace. The Archbishop of Canterbury’s daughter made a statement with a cobalt shoe.

gail porter

Meanwhile, Gail Porter chose to go casual, in a camouflage jacket, her guest looking very of-the-minute in a wide-leg pinstripe trouser.

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Murdered by Anorexia

News

Image copyright of orangetreetheatre.co.uk

One year ago, 56 year old actress Briony McRoberts took her own life, jumping in front of a train. Her real killer? Anorexia.

After suffering with the eating disorder in her teenage years, Briony had lived a normal life, relatively free from Anorexic tendencies until she reached her 50’s and the illness began to develop again, this time fatally. On BBC Radio 5 Live this morning (see link below) her husband, Downton Abbey actor David Robb gave an incredibly moving, influential interview discussing Briony’s struggle, in a bid to raise awareness of the fact that Anorexia can effect anyone, at any age and it is not just a phase which is going to go away.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p022tvgd

Although eating disorders may be more widely discussed now than a few years back, it is still generally thought that Anorexia is a ‘teenage girls illness’. Briony’s tragic story brings to the forefront just how real and dangerous Anorexia is. I personally, found the discussion extremely difficult to listen to, it really hit home hard, as I’m sure it did for many other listeners, but I felt an overwhelming respect for David for speaking so bravely, with such depth and understanding and for bringing the issue to attention. As harrowing as stories such as this are, society needs people such as David, and the other women who called in to the show to share their stories, to speak out. This is the first step to making people aware of the reality and creating some sort of general understanding.

A woman, also in her 50’s and a sufferer of Anorexia since her teens, spoke honestly and openly on the show of how the Anorexic voice in her mind is stronger than her love for her four children. It is completely unfathomable to a non-sufferer but it is the brutal truth.

Just as a sufferer of alcohol or drug abuse can overcome their addiction but it will still stay with them, lurking in wait of an opportunity to show up again, a knock back in life, a moment of weakness, Anorexia is the same. It never goes away, it can be overcome, but there is always a chance that the sufferer will resort to those same coping mechanisms (starvation) again, giving the illness the power to manifest again.

People do make full recoveries from Anorexia and live a life free from the illness, but it doesn’t just disappear. Anorexia can affect anyone, any age. It isn’t just a fad and it isn’t going away.